Many of us have seen it happen while watching singing competition shows like The Voice, American Idol, or The X Factor— “You’re voice is incredible, but the song choice was all wrong.”  It usually ends with an elimination, especially if it is a consistent pattern.  You might love a certain genre of music, but knowing whether a song is a good fit for your voice and audition is critical. Like many things, success is dependent on knowing your strengths and showcasing them.  So what are the best so
The second half of the learning equation comes down to location. It takes a supportive environment to get great results, which is why we host our lessons in professionally-designed studio spaces. They're climate-controlled to keep you comfortable so you can maintain focus on the lesson, and acoustically-insulated so your voice will ring true and you can easily hear your progress from session to session. Of course, our lessons will provide you with plenty of insight and direction for practicing at home as well!
A description of how the vocal folds produce sound, including photos of real live vocal folds! You will learn how they come together for phonation (singing/speaking etc), and what they are doing at rest. You will also learn where they are placed in the throat. This lecture will help you understand why good vocal technique is important, and behind a sore or inflamed throat (and how to avoid it if you can!)
At School of Rock, we teach private singing lessons in conjunction with weekly band rehearsals meant to build confidence and teamwork. While we do offer private singing instruction, we strongly encourage students to play in band rehearsals as a way of exploring group dynamics, and get the chance to find out what it's like to sing lead vocals for a rock band.
If you're new to singing, or if you're just trying to fine-tune your vocal skills, one fun and helpful exercise is to sing duet songs with your vocal instructor or a friend. Pick a style you both like and you'll find that the possibilities for both fun and music making are endless! Why Are They Helpful to Sing? When you sing with piano, or with a chorus or band, there's often someone else playing the same line you're singing. While this is great for learning to sing in tune and working on … Read More
I take a physiological approach to singing... after all it is a physical endeavor.  The voice or larynx, despite all its complexities, is just another set of muscles that can be trained to reach its fullest potential.  The method that I teach, “The Franco/Italian Bel Canto Method” has been taught in Europe for more than 200 years and has produced the world’s greatest classical singers.  Now having said that let me assure you studying this method doesn’t mean that you have to become a classical singer.  The techniques used are designed to strengthen and improve the quality of the human voice and can be applied to any genre ... View Profile
If you're new to singing, or if you're just trying to fine-tune your vocal skills, one fun and helpful exercise is to sing duet songs with your vocal instructor or a friend. Pick a style you both like and you'll find that the possibilities for both fun and music making are endless! Why Are They Helpful to Sing? When you sing with piano, or with a chorus or band, there's often someone else playing the same line you're singing. While this is great for learning to sing in tune and working on … Read More
Learn the basic principles of the Alexander Technique to help you understand where some functional problems may lie. The Alexander Technique is an excellent technique that will help you rectify these problems to improve both singing and posture. Learn also about the health benefits of this technique - many can be improved and even cured just by correcting your posture!

Correct breathing for singers begins with a spontaneous open breath.  Upon inhalation, if ones hands are placed on the stomach - an inch below belly button, the hands will be pushed out by stomach muscles.  The singer's shoulders should be relaxed and not move up.  Neck and jaw should be relaxed.  Jaw needs to be unhinged.  Phonation begins with the movement of the stomach inward, where one is singing while pulling the stomach muscles in.  This is called "singing on the breath."  The phonation ends with the release of the abdominal muscles.  It's important to note that phonation should be ended with the release of the abs and not in one's throat, which is vocally abusive.
Isabel is very professional and fun to work with. In our first few lessons, we worked on solidifying some basic fundamentals of singing (proper breathing, posture, etc.) and have since moved on to some simple songs/arias. She is a wonderful teacher for beginners like me, but with her skill level, I can see her as being an exceptional teacher for more advanced students as well.
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