Correct breathing for singers begins with a spontaneous open breath.  Upon inhalation, if ones hands are placed on the stomach - an inch below belly button, the hands will be pushed out by stomach muscles.  The singer's shoulders should be relaxed and not move up.  Neck and jaw should be relaxed.  Jaw needs to be unhinged.  Phonation begins with the movement of the stomach inward, where one is singing while pulling the stomach muscles in.  This is called "singing on the breath."  The phonation ends with the release of the abdominal muscles.  It's important to note that phonation should be ended with the release of the abs and not in one's throat, which is vocally abusive.
This is a great book to teach little kids to match pitch and learn to read music. Every lesson is just at their level and fun so they like to learn! I highly suggest this book for those teaching private or group lessons or beginning choirs. This is the Very Young Beginner Series so it's geared toward ages 3-7. This also follows the Kolday method quite a bit, has extra songs in the back, a page for the student to color at home or in the classroom that goes along with the story the teacher or parent can help the student read and of course the song. There are also lessons in the back for the teacher! Oh, and recordings of the main songs (vocal track amd accompaniment) online! So awesome! I'm using this meathod book to teach a 3 1/2 year old who really seems to like it and ... full review

Riley could not even look adults in the eye when speaking to them when Steve began teaching her at age 10. But by the time she graduated high school at 18, she had blossomed into a very powerful, skilled, and controlled singer who had starred in several school productions and won several awards and accolades such as the NJ NATS award and the NJ All-State Honors Choir.
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