Have you ever wondered how singers such as Whitney Houston, Freddy Mercury, Maria Carey, Elvis Presley and Ariana Grande produce that beautiful sound? The answer is "Bel Canto." It's not just a vocal technique, it's a science. Some great singers intuitively apply the concepts of "Bel Canto" to reach vocal greatness while others were taught. At "Beautiful Voice NJ" students learn everything from how to produce a gorgeous tone to how to gain ultimate pitch control. Modern day Bel Canto, which means "Beautiful Singing," is applied to all styles of music: Rock, Pop, Alternative, Jazz, R&B, Funk, Blues, Soul, Broadway, Country, Hip Hop, Classical and more.

International recording artist, entertainer, and music educator NaTasha Rogers, respectfully known as #THETALKBOXQUEEN, is back from Japan & ready to serve & empower future recording artists and entertainers alike! Ages 18 & up! *Younger students accepted on case by case basis 19+ years in the music entertainment industry! Texas Certified Music License EC-12! *10 years Music Producer! *Multi-Genre (Pop, R&B, Gospel, Hip-Hop, & More!) Audio Engineer! Songwriter! Jazz Vocalist and Pianist! Music Theory 101! Live Performance Normal 0 false false false EN-US ZH-CN X-NONE ... View Profile
Now that you have warmed up your resonating chambers, you can try singing on other vowels to continue warming up the voice. The "Aah" sound is one of the hardest to produce - but you should be able to perform this without pressure or force if you are doing all these exercises in succession. This is because we have placed major focus on exercises that keep the feeling of the voice in the face, nose and mouth.
Singing with clarity and control is necessary for a good sound. This group singing class will cover vocal exercises for singers such as how to bring your voice forward into the face to improve your overall sound. This will be accomplished by looking at vocal anatomy and learning some voice exercises and warmups that can be practiced daily. These vocal training tips will help you use your voice to its fullest potential!
Selecting the right repertoire is a big part of a successful audition -- but be careful, as there are so many overdone musical theatre audition songs out there. Here, Molly R. shares six songs to avoid... and what to try instead!   With musical theatre auditions, often the toughest part isn't the audition itself, but instead making a decision on what to sing. I’m here to help narrow it down by telling you what NOT to sing in an audition -- the overdone musical theatre audition songs.
Here are a couple of basic things a singer can do to start building a bigger voice: use correct breathing method, engage vocal resonances and master singing on clean stationary vowels.  There is a common misconception about how to breathe.  Some believe that a singer needs to expand their ribcage out horizontally while inhaling.  That is incorrect.  This will result in various issues such as limited vocal range, pitch problems, a wobbly shaky vibrato and more.
Jeannie Deva helped thousands around the world to improve their vocal performance as one of the top Voice and Performance Coaches in the world. Her clients included Grammy Award winners, multi-platinum recording artists and leads in iconic Broadway shows. She was a member of the Grammy committee, published author, clinician, vocal producer and founder of The Deva Method® used by singers and voice teachers around the world. As a session vocal coach she worked with producers and engineers for such luminaries as Aerosmith, The Rolling Stones, The Cars and Amy Winehouse. Jeannie taught at ArtistWorks until she passed in 2016.

Trained as a classical pianist, I used to moonlight playing popular songs I heard on the radio and would hide it from my teacher. Nowadays, I ask my students what would like they to play and pick one or two songs that they like so they can practice. I don't mind if my student plays a Chopin Nocturne and then a blues/ jazz song. It's to create combination using all sides of the brain and engage students in making music. 
Singing with clarity and control is necessary for a good sound. This group singing class will cover vocal exercises for singers such as how to bring your voice forward into the face to improve your overall sound. This will be accomplished by looking at vocal anatomy and learning some voice exercises and warmups that can be practiced daily. These vocal training tips will help you use your voice to its fullest potential!
Many 4-year-olds love to sing, but they likely lack the focus for formal voice lessons. However, it's not too early to begin teaching your child musical concepts that will be important once they are old enough for singing instruction at School of Rock. Your 4-year-old can participate in the Little Wing music program to learn fundamental concepts through fun, dynamic musical activities.
In 2011, Ms. McMurtery performed the role of Papagena in a concert version of Mozart's Die Zauberflöte with New York Lyric Opera. In 2010, she performed in St. John's, Newfoundland as a participant in the Opera on the Avalon summer training program. Other operatic roles performed include Susanna (Le nozze di Fiagro, Mozart), Sister Dolcina (Suor Angelica, Puccini), Poppea (L'incoronazione di Poppea, Monteverdi), Héro (Béatrice et Bénédict, Berlioz), Mercedes (Carmen, Bizet), and Ännchen (Der Freischütz, C.M. von Weber). Also a frequent recitalist, she performed as the soprano soloist for the Hugo Wolf/Goethe Project in New York, NY for the (re:) Directions Theater Company in 2010. Other studies abroad include the Florence Voice Seminar, in Florence, Italy (2007 and 2005), and at the Carl Maria von Weber Hochschule für Musik in Dresden, Germany (2002). Ms. McMurtery holds a Master of Music degree in Voice Performance and Pedagogy from Westminster Choir College of Rider University (2006) and a Bachelor of Music degree in Voice Performance and German from DePauw University of Greencastle, Indiana (2004).
Isabel is very professional and fun to work with. In our first few lessons, we worked on solidifying some basic fundamentals of singing (proper breathing, posture, etc.) and have since moved on to some simple songs/arias. She is a wonderful teacher for beginners like me, but with her skill level, I can see her as being an exceptional teacher for more advanced students as well.

Alison Huntley is currently a Graduate Assistant at WIU pursuing a Master's Degree in Choral Conducting. Previously, Alison graduated from WIU in 2015 with a Bachelor's Degree in Choral Music Education and Vocal Performance, and then spent a year teaching K-12 General Music and Choir. Miss Huntley is active with the University Singers, Madrigal Singers, and Opera Theatre.
Lessons not booked in calendar at least 24 hours in advance of the lesson start time cannot be set to student no-show status. Why? Booking a lesson in your calender sends out notification to student on where and when they should be for their lesson and notifies them to our 24 hour cancellation policy. Without these notices we can not ensure that student was aware of the lesson in question or of our policy.

Correct breathing for singers begins with a spontaneous open breath.  Upon inhalation, if ones hands are placed on the stomach - an inch below belly button, the hands will be pushed out by stomach muscles.  The singer's shoulders should be relaxed and not move up.  Neck and jaw should be relaxed.  Jaw needs to be unhinged.  Phonation begins with the movement of the stomach inward, where one is singing while pulling the stomach muscles in.  This is called "singing on the breath."  The phonation ends with the release of the abdominal muscles.  It's important to note that phonation should be ended with the release of the abs and not in one's throat, which is vocally abusive.
The final piece of the puzzle is flexible scheduling. It's our mission to make Guitar Center vocal lessons accessible to anyone, so even if your timetable is jam-packed, we encourage you to get in touch and find out how we can work around your busy lifestyle to tailor a lesson plan to your personal scheduling needs. It's the least we can do to make sure that music - and a newfound superstar singing voice - are well within the reach of everybody with the passion to realize his or her potential.
I am taking the bluegrass singing course and I find it excellent.Easy to follow, starts where it should and has a huge range of challenge in the one course.If I could I'd quit my job and study it all day.The video feedback is an excellent addendum and I'd recommend this to anyone even a seasoned player just wanting to sharpen up. A true fan I am I am.... 

Correct breathing for singers begins with a spontaneous open breath.  Upon inhalation, if ones hands are placed on the stomach - an inch below belly button, the hands will be pushed out by stomach muscles.  The singer's shoulders should be relaxed and not move up.  Neck and jaw should be relaxed.  Jaw needs to be unhinged.  Phonation begins with the movement of the stomach inward, where one is singing while pulling the stomach muscles in.  This is called "singing on the breath."  The phonation ends with the release of the abdominal muscles.  It's important to note that phonation should be ended with the release of the abs and not in one's throat, which is vocally abusive.
In addition to nurturing a child's passion for singing, it's important to keep his or her voice healthy as they grow and get stronger vocals. The main purpose of children's singing lessons is to make the learning process fun. As a student begins to enjoy the learning and improvement process, the instructor can work on advancing the fundamentals, techniques, and practice of singing.
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